My experience... Parallels is a disaster!

Discussion in 'Installation and Configuration' started by jaydear, Aug 26, 2007.

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  1. thoughton

    thoughton

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    Online for 23 years eh? That's quite an achievement. May I ask what you were doing online? Since you obviously weren't emailing or browsing the web, since neither of those technologies had been invented in 1984...
     
  2. thoughton

    thoughton

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    Yet another "fact" from you. Let's see now, you were running your business online 15 years ago. That's 1992. In 1992 the web was in it's infancy. This was before the Mosaic browser even existed. There were a total of 26 WWW servers world wide. In what way was your business "running online"?

    http://www.w3.org/History.html
     
  3. OS9Alive.com

    OS9Alive.com

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    Oh my.. I can see alot of you dont know how to read.

    Martin, to begin with I dont copy and paste anything and sure dont use some out-of-date software such as dreamweaver. I develope and build in Php which by the way is programming.

    thoughton, you need to learn how to do research better. The internet has been around since the ealry 60's.. In 1992 AOL was already running online for close to 10 years and around that time AOL also bought out eWorld (eWorld was owned by Apple, which was a ISP). For your information back in the early 80's mostly news and some games existed and no at that time browsers or domain names did not exist. You actually had to have a cartridge along with the computer and dial-up cost was around $3.99 an hour.

    I think my points have been made and it is clear some of you cant read proper and there is no need to continue with forum posters that dont even understand basic statements.

    James
     
  4. thoughton

    thoughton

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    The early 60s? What a load of BS. I'll give you AOL in 1992, although most people would simply call AOL (and eWorld) a BBS and not "being online". I stand by my statement that there is no way in hell you were online 23 years ago.

    "it is clear some of you cant read proper". Classic.
     
    Last edited: Sep 13, 2007
  5. OS9Alive.com

    OS9Alive.com

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    Your funny!! No knowledge of the Net but try to speak about it.. AOL original Copyright 1982 look that up dude. I know as I was a beta tester for AOL 2.4.

    Yes the Internet existed back in the 60's and anybody that has been online as long as me and there are many, knows the same thing. Maybe you never heard of the Unites States Government ..lol
     
  6. Gryzor

    Gryzor

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    Oh, a PHP Programmer! That's got to explain it all. phpinfo();

    If you were online twenty three years ago, then you should've learnt some lessons. So this rant is off-topic, inappropiate, plagued with misdirections, false facts, and a shot of stupidity (and I include myself).

    If you prefer to have a Windows box around, nobody is against that. I, however, do not find your point to be valid. I respect your point of view, but I completely disagree with it. I don't think that Apple is misleading its customers by "not saying that you need to.. bla bla bla".

    I imagine people a Microsoft being sued because they never mentioned that you needed OS X to run OfficeX, and worse, not saying that to run OS X you needed an Appleâ„¢ Computer.

    Hillarious. Just don't defend yourself by using basic statements like "people can't read", that's sooooooooooooo low.

    C'mon, you don't have a case here. You just have problems with paralells and wanted to blame the world. Better blame canada. (south park quote).

    ;)
     
  7. Welly

    Welly

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    Are you being serious? As a developer of 15 years, you sure seem naive. How did you possibly think an Intel Mac would run Windows without a copy of Windows? Did you pay for Bootcamp? No, you didn't. So no, you didn't need to buy more software to run Windows. But seriously, how do you really expect to run Windows without purchasing a copy of Windows? Come on guy!
     
  8. OS9Alive.com

    OS9Alive.com

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    I did not say Intel would run winblows without a copy of winblows, oh my god would you people read proper.. I dont even have bootcamp at all and never said I did.

    Its obvious that alot of you have very limited knowledge and just skim through post without reading them.

    I have un-sub from this thread because some of you seem to think you know it all but all you are doing is making yourself look like idiots when you cant read a simple post.
     
  9. Gryzor

    Gryzor

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    Good idea. Because this post should've never existed in the 1st place.
     
  10. Welly

    Welly

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    I apologise, no, you didn't say an Intel mac would run Windows without Windows. However, why did you get the impression that Apple would bundle a copy of Windows with an intel mac? No one else seems to have got that impression, just you. And you only need a copy of Windows plus bootcamp, which is free, to run Windows.
     
  11. Alicia

    Alicia Parallels Team

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    Gentlemen, it's the public place, so it would be much better if you refrain from further offtop & flame. I just can suggest you to continue your arguments via PM.

    Best Regards, Alicia.
     
  12. Gryzor

    Gryzor

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    "To start off with Apple (even though I supported them for years) did infact lead the public to think that this Intel Crap would run winblows with no mention at first that you needed to buy more software to run it and you also had to buy a copy of winblows software."

    So you're saying that Apple should have said: "In order to use Windowsâ„¢ on a Mac, you have to buy a copy of Microsoft Windowsâ„¢".

    Is that it?

    Let's put it the other way:

    Microsoft Office for Mac: "In order to use MS OFfice for Mac, you need to buy a copy of OS X; and also a Macintosh Computer, because there's no other hardware legaly capable of running OS X, don't say we didn't tell you!".

    You've made the foolest statement I've read in many years.

    But you wrote that, I am not reading. I'm copying and pasting. So whether I can read or not, is not an issue here.

    You said that. And you also said: "I have the guts to say it" -> I agree!
     
  13. Gryzor

    Gryzor

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    <sarcasm>
    Yeah, thanks. We were just having some fun; after all, Alicia, not everybody here have had the oportunity to be on-line twenty three years ago! I had my first Texas Instruments Ti-994a in 1985/6 and I had an analog phone line that su**** big time.
    However, I felt "online" once, while trying to fix a wire, and touching it while it was still connected. The 220v shock proved to be an online experience, I was part of the electric network for a few seconds. Does that count?
    ;)
    </sarcasm>
     
  14. Jay Levitt

    Jay Levitt

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    48
    OK, I know the whole thread is OT, but it's really funny to watch people argue about stuff they don't remember based on other stuff they read on the Internet.

    Coupla things:

    * America Online, the service, did not exist in 1982. What did exist was Control Video Corporation, a young company preparing to launch GameLine, an online service for the immensely popular Atari 2600 videogame console. Sadly, the videogame market went kablooey the next year, and GameLine never launched. CVC went out of business, but the same employees formed Quantum Computer Services, and went on to launch Q-Link, an online service for Commodore 64 computers, in 1985, in partnership with Commodore. Though it had the same staff, in the same building, running the same computers, Quantum was a completely different company than CVC. You hear me, creditors, IRS? Completely different company. Total coincidence.

    Quantum went on to launch other partnered services: PC-Link (for Tandy computers), AppleLink Personal Edition (for Apple II and IIgs), and Promenade (for the IBM PS/1). In 1989, just as version 1.0 of the Mac software for ALPE was about to launch, Apple pulled out of the deal, and AppleLink Personal Edition was renamed America Online. In 1991 the company itself was renamed to America Online.

    (In 1993, Apple once again paid America Online big bucks to launch eWorld, which required an exact replica of the AOL server farm and software to be shipped to Apple in Cupertino, where they would operate their own service for Macs. Within a year, eWorld was gone, all the new eWorld-specific features were folded back into the main AOL software, and the user bases were merged. Thus, Apple paid AOL twice to not run an online service, which has always made me giggle.)

    * There was no version 2.4. There was 2.0, possibly a 2.1 bug release, and then 2.5. There was a 1.4, I think, for PCAO (the DOS version of America Online that ran under PC/GEOS).

    * AOL, CompuServe, GEnie, Prodigy, The Source, Delphi, and others were all considered "online services", not BBS's, although the term "online" was general enough to refer to both. BBS's were run by individuals or small companies and usually had a single phone line - the larger ones had maybe a dozen lines. AOL itself briefly ran a tech support BBS for people who could get their modems and computers configured well enough to use a terminal program, but not well enough to use the fickle AOL software.

    * People were e-mailing in the 1960s, well before online services and even BBS's. Ray Tomlinson started using the @ sign for e-mail in 1971.

    * Tech-savvy businesses did operate "online" well before the Internet. I remember seeing Comp-U-Card shopping on CompuServe circa 1984. And although there was little other "e-commerce", many businesses had an online presence, perhaps an e-mail address, a BBS, or a forum or area on an online service.

    Hope this clears a few things up.

    Jay Levitt
    Chief Mail Systems Architect and many other roles at America Online
    1989-2001
     
  15. MarkHolbrook

    MarkHolbrook

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    350
    Jay... that was a good trip down memory lane.

    My first ever experience with "e-mail" was when you could seen mail to other universities using stuff like uucp. Remember addresses like:


    <institution>!<institution>!<institution>... etc...? I can't even remember the exact sequence now but since there were no domains you had to route your email yourself by forcing it to go from institution to institution.

    I remember getting a 300 baud modem and being impressed. I was then REALLY impressed at 1200 baud half duplex.

    Now I get frustrated if I have anything less than a 6mb download speed.

    Boy things have changed.

    M
     
  16. thoughton

    thoughton

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    12
    I don't know who referred to them as online services. Maybe the marketing people did. They were clearly BBS's, albeit large ones with their own GUI.

    And the history of email is interesting, but perhaps I should have specified commercially available dial-in email and not that restricted to mainframe users.
     
  17. Alicia

    Alicia Parallels Team

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    683
    Dear Users,

    The facts you wrote, they are really great and interesting but, unfortunately, they became so offtopic. Furthermore, primary purpose of the thread has been lost and the topic has settled itself. Thus I think I have to close this thread.
    I hope on your understanding. You are welcome to write me a PM in case you have questions or objections.

    Beat regards, Alicia.
     
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