Upgrading to Leopard

Discussion in 'Installation and Configuration' started by mjokerst, Jan 20, 2008.

  1. mjokerst

    mjokerst

    Messages:
    14
    I'm preparing to upgrade from Tiger to Leopard, and have an install of Parallels 3.0 Build 5584 currently running fine on Tiger OS. I'm monitoring Driver49's post and plan to follow Stacey's recommended sequence of uninstall parallels-upgradeOS-reinstall parallels. I'm also following Joe Kissel's great ebook "Take Control of Upgrading to Leopard" which contains very clear instructions for preparing your machine for the upgrade. I will have a complete backup clone of the Tiger drive before making the plunge.

    So far, two questions:

    1. Parallels web page http://www.parallels.com/en/support/leopard/ states "We highly recommend that Parallels Desktop customers only run Parallels Desktop 3.0 Build 5582 on their new Leopard operating systems" Is this correct, or will a re-install of Build 5584 work as well?

    2. Of the three OS upgrade options (Upgrade, Archive/Install & Erase/Install) available for the Leopard upgrade, is there a preferred path from the Parallels perspective. Seems like a mute question, given the "uninstall route", but never hurts to ask.

    p.s. Autocad-version 8 on Windows XP Pro on Parallels 3.0 on a MacPro beats Windows on a PC hands down. No fuss. So far every Parallels upgrade has been smooth and the results are just great. I cringe every time I fire up the old PC.
     
  2. mjokerst

    mjokerst

    Messages:
    14
    Update

    I've successfully upgraded to Leopard, and Parallels is working as before. Here's what I did:

    1. Cleanup my Tiger installation. (See ebook "Take Control of Upgrading to Leopard)
    2. Make a bootable clone of the Tiger installation, including a working version of Parallels 3.0 build 5584
    3. Test the bootable clone

    At this point, if anything goes wrong I can restore my Tiger install in short order. This clone contains all my apps, all my home folder, including the parallels virtual machine found in ~/Documents/Parallels/etc.

    4. Uninstall Parallels using the Parallels Uninstall utility.
    5. Keep the external Tiger backup mounted and
    6. Install Leopard (using the option "Erase and Install")
    7. Use the "Setup Assistant" to transfer from Tiger backup to the new Leopard;

    This step is part of the Leopard install. It brings most of your applications and preferences and all of your home folder from the Tiger backup drive to the Leopard install. It leaves out things that will likely conflict with Leopard. A thorough Step 1 (see above) is essential to making this step work properly. This step also gets your old Parallels Virtual Machine and puts it in the right place in your leopard system.

    8. Upgrade your OSX (as needed), test the installation.
    9. Keep the Tiger backup, but make a second bootable Leopard backup.

    (I partitioned my firewire drive before-hand, so now one partition has working Tiger/Parallels and the other has a working Leopard-but-no-Parallels install. I can now attempt to install parallels, but if it gets messy, I can revert back to a clean pre-parallels Leopard machine.)

    10. Install Parallels (I used build 5584), install the tools.

    It works real fine, and will be going billable tomorrow, I hope.
     
  3. darienphoenix

    darienphoenix

    Messages:
    3
    Is all that really necessary?

    I mean, when upgrading a Windows OS it is always better to do a clean install due to all the associated junk left over by the previous install, but from what I've heard OS X is nowhere near as bad.

    Is there any real disadvantage to using 'Archive & Install' or even 'Upgrade'? Does anyone know?
     
  4. driver49

    driver49

    Messages:
    64
    Thank you, mjokerst, for following my own posts and for starting this thread with your own very informative routine. I like very much the way you have spelled it all out, step by step.

    I can appreciate the advantage of doing erase/install of Leopard. I guess it's always best to start a new OS with a clean slate.

    But... what happens to your WINDOWS installation when you do that? Don't you then have to reinstall windows, and all the programs associated with it, to get it running again?

    Does the bootable back up you make of Tiger include all your Windows partition data, at least, or do you have to do something to extra to back up and restore that data after you have installed Parellels.

    I had some difficulty intalling Windows last summer when I made my switch. Parallels kept not recognizing the Windows CD, and I wound up on the phone with Parallels tech support, which took about an hour, learning how to make a virtual copy of the CD on the HDD, which of course I have now forgotten how to do so if I run into that problem again I'm going to wind up on the phone with Parallels Tech Support again.

    It seems to me the straight "UPgrade" routine recommended by Parallels here (in my earlier posts:

    http://forum.parallels.com/showthread.php?t=19064&goto=newpost

    has the advantage of leaving Windows intact, which of course would not be the case with an erase/install. Unless of course doing the "Setup Assistant" during the erase/install would restore all my Windows stuff. But I'm doubting that would actually happen.

    I just got a book "Total Leopard" from MacWorld, I'll look and see what it has to say about upgrading to the new OS, and if it doesn't seem adequate, I'll get that book you suggest.

    Thanks,

    --PS
     
  5. mjokerst

    mjokerst

    Messages:
    14
    driver 49: Good questions. Your "windows" installation ( which includes the windows OS and all the windows programs you have installed and any data files in your windows virtual drive) resides in a single folder as a collection of files in that folder. This folder will be found in your documents folder. The path to mine is users/my_home_directory/documents/parallels/microsoft windows xp. As I understand it, the .hdd is your entire windows installation as created in parallels, and the other files do important things of which I know boo.

    When you uninstall parallels (using their uninstall program please), it WILL NOT erase your virtual windows files. When you are done installing, the parallels/windows xp folder will still be there and still be intact. Very cool. Then what happens is this:

    1. You run the Leopard install. Once Leopard is installed, the install program brings up a "setup assistant", which is a little program that scans your bootable backup (which should have been mounted before you start the leopard install, so it is still mounted and on as leopard installs itself). If you direct it to, setup assistant will bring your entire home directory (including the parallels folder in documents) onto your newly made leopard boot drive. Setup Assistant will also get all of your applications from the bootable backup and install them on the new leopard boot drive, keeping all your old preferences intact. (This is why you must uninstall Parallels; you dont want setup assistant to bring it over; that's where the parallels-versus-leopard incompatibilities arise.) So, you let setup assistant do it's thing, and you have everything you had before reinstalled on your leopard boot drive, except parallels. This whole "setup assistant" biz is explained in better detail in the "Take Control of Upgrading to Leopar..." ebook I mentioned before.

    2. Install parallels. You must use the correct Parallels 3.0 build, which I used 5584.

    3. Start parallels desktop. It will find your old windows virtual drive, right there in user/home/documents/parallels/etc. Before you start windows from the parallels desktop, go to ACTIONS on the parallels desktop menu, and select the option to install Windows Tools. Then you can start windows, and you will have everything as you left it before upgrading leopard.

    It's recommended to make a second backup of your documents.parallels folder, just in case. That HDD file contains your install & authenticated windows applications and it is worth some bucks, so keep an extra backup.

    One other thing: The reason erase/install works well is that parallels puts some files and settings into the system folder, like all programs. It is these settings that end up being in conflict with Leopard if you do a simple install, or possibly a archive/install. The most positive way to make sure they do not crop up in your leopard system is to erase them in an erase/install. If you do the straight upgrade, as I understand it, some of these settings may remain once leopard is installed. (I'm a very green apple geek, but that;s the jist of what I learned doing the same research you are doing.)

    It's not like the erase/install is a lot of work. The big hurdle is having that bootable backup, which many of us never seem to get around to doing. Once you have that in place, the erase/install is gonna be as much work as any other option. Maybe some extra minutes are spent twiddling your thumbs.

    mjokerst
     
  6. mjokerst

    mjokerst

    Messages:
    14
    Sorry, found some boo-boos soon as I posted this. Here is corrected reply:

    driver 49: Good questions. Your "windows" installation (which includes the windows OS and all the windows programs you have installed and any data files in your windows virtual drive) resides in a single folder as a collection of files in that folder. This folder will be found in your documents folder. The path to mine is users/my_home_directory/documents/parallels/microsoft windows xp. As I understand it, the .hdd file is your entire windows installation as created in parallels, and the other files in that folder do important things of which I know boo.

    When you uninstall parallels (using their uninstall program please), it WILL NOT erase your virtual windows files. When you are done un-installing, the parallels/windows xp folder will still be there and still be intact. Very cool. Then what happens is this:

    1. You run the Leopard install. Once Leopard is installed, the install program brings up a "setup assistant", which is a little program that scans your bootable backup (which should have been mounted before you start the leopard install, so it is still mounted and on as leopard installs itself). If you direct it to, setup assistant will bring your entire home directory (including the parallels folder in documents) from your bootable backup onto your newly made leopard boot drive. Setup Assistant will also get all of your applications from the bootable backup and install them on the new leopard boot drive, keeping all your old preferences intact. (This is why you must uninstall Parallels; you dont want setup assistant to bring it over; that's where the parallels-versus-leopard incompatibilities arise.) So, you let setup assistant do it's thing, and you have everything you had before reinstalled on your leopard boot drive, except parallels. This whole "setup assistant" biz is explained in better detail in the "Take Control of Upgrading to Leopar..." ebook I mentioned before.

    2. Install parallels. You must use the correct Parallels 3.0 build, which I used 5584.

    3. Start parallels desktop. It will find your old windows virtual drive, right there in user/home/documents/parallels/etc. Before you start windows from the parallels desktop, go to ACTIONS on the parallels desktop menu, and select the option to install Windows Tools. Then you can start windows, and you will have everything as you left it before upgrading leopard.

    It's recommended to make a second backup of your documents.parallels folder, just in case. That HDD file contains your install & authenticated windows applications and it is worth some bucks, so keep an extra backup.

    One other thing: The reason erase/install works well is that parallels puts some files and settings into the system folder, like all programs. It is these settings that end up being in conflict with Leopard if you do a simple install, or possibly a archive/install. The most positive way to make sure they do not crop up in your leopard system is to erase them in an erase/install. If you do the straight upgrade, as I understand it, some of these settings may remain once leopard is installed. (I'm a very green apple geek, but that;s the jist of what I learned doing the same research you are doing.)

    It's not like the erase/install is a lot of work. The big hurdle is having that bootable backup, which many of us never seem to get around to doing. Once you have that in place, the erase/install is gonna be as much work as any other option. Maybe some extra minutes are spent twiddling your thumbs.

    mjokerst
     
  7. driver49

    driver49

    Messages:
    64
    Erase or Upgrade?

    mjokerst wrote:
    >>When you uninstall parallels (using their uninstall program please), it WILL NOT erase your virtual windows files. When you are done installing, the parallels/windows xp folder will still be there and still be intact. Very cool. Then what happens is this:<<

    Do I understand correctly that in this scenario, you are suggesting the upgrade/install (or whatever it is called) of Leopard, as opposed to the "erase/install" ?

    I mean, if you erase/install, won't the "virtual windows files" be erased along with everything else? I can see how this would work with an upgrade/install, because then all the Windows stuff would still be there, just absent the Parallels stuff that would have been uinstalled. Then when Parallels is reinstalled, Windows is there, just waiting to be found by Parallels. Right?

    Or, are you saying that when you do the "setup assistant" step with the erase/install, that the setup assistant will restore all the Windows stuff, too?

    I'm also going to have to figure out how exactly I get the correct build of Parallels. Mine is 4128 from last June, which I have not messed with because... it works fine.

    Again, my target date for actually doing this is probably mid-March. So, plenty of time to get my ducks lined up and questions answered.

    Thanks,

    --PS
     
  8. mjokerst

    mjokerst

    Messages:
    14
    If you make a bootable backup of your entire Tiger Drivem your "windows drive" will be safely stored on your bootable backup drive. When you erase/install, yes everything is obliterated. Setup Assistant brings your "windows drive" from your bootable backup and puts it on your leopard drive.

    Your "windows drive", otherwise known as the parallels virtual drive, is simply a single file, a disk image if you will. It's stored in your home directory, in documents, in the parallels folder. It has an hdd extension. This file is totally independent of the parallels desktop program. It was created by parallels desktop, but think of it as a data file. Just like an excel file, it isnt stored with the application, it is your data and is stored in your home folder. You can uninstall excel, and that act will not erase all your .xls files, right? The virtual drive is the same thing, just a data file. You could take this virtual drive and carry from machine to another, it's portable, just like an xls file. Pretty cool really.

    When you start parallels, it goes to your home directory, to the documents folder, looks for a parallels folder, finds your virtual drive and then starts working. Don't ever move or rename your documents/parallels folder, parallels would be lost.

    I really like the "taking Control" book becuase it is step-by-step. Very little theory, just "do this" then "do that". It explains things as you go, and when choices arise, it covers the pros and cons well. It discusses the "bootable backup" issue as well, which you should understand gives you a very simple path backward:

    If you make a bootable clone of your current Tiger-Parallels Build 4128, then do the Leopard-Parallels Build 5584 install and find that it is not working, well you simply boot onto your Tiger clone and you are back in business, with breathing room to troubleshoot the Leopard install. You should test your bootable backup before you install leopard: Just go to system preferences, select "startup disk", select your bootable backup drive and click restart. Or you can boot from your backup using the appropriate key hold during powerup (the particular key varies, you should find out what it is NOW).

    I have a firewire SATA drive that is partitioned into two drives. I use "Carbon Copy Cloner" to make bootable backups, it's a great (simple and quick) program. It clones my drive at the rate of 1gig per minute. When I upgraded, I put the Tiger clone on one partition. Ran the Leopard Upgrade with Setup Assistant, but didn't install Parallels, then made a Leopard clone on the other partition, then I installed Parallels. This way, if the parallels install scrambled my system, I could revert to the pure leopard system and try again, or revert to the Tiger system if I had to work on parallels while things got sorted out. Almost fail safe.
     
  9. driver49

    driver49

    Messages:
    64
    Great, Got It Now + FW -v- USB2

    >>If you make a bootable backup of your entire Tiger Drivem your "windows drive" will be safely stored on your bootable backup drive. When you erase/install, yes everything is obliterated. Setup Assistant brings your "windows drive" from your bootable backup and puts it on your leopard drive.<<

    OK, that's the answer I think I was hoping for, and I thank you for taking all the time to spell this out for me. I hope others have also benefited from your contribution.

    I have a couple of external drives around the house, all USB2.0... maybe not as fast as firewire, but fast enough, I suppose. I've got Firewire drive, too, although it's on my Mac Pro at the moment I suppose I could use that...

    I guess I need to have the clone drive connected via Firewire, huh?

    Thanks,

    --PS
     
  10. mjokerst

    mjokerst

    Messages:
    14
    I think it has to be firewire to be bootable, but not completely sure of that. It has to be bootable: One, setup assistant has to have a bootable drive to get the files from, not sure why, but I think it wants a fully functional drive to transfer files from so it gets the settings and preferences right. Second, YOU want a bootable backup, for reasons stated before (Fail SAFE). So, whatever the drive, make sure it is bootable ! You'll find the USB to be pretty slow compared to the Firewire.
     
  11. Riechert

    Riechert

    Messages:
    4
    Hi, i do not really understand the whole discussion above. I have a Macmini with a Core 2 Duo 2,16 GHZ Processor (Merom). RAM is 2 GHZ. Disk is a 100 GHZ Seagate with 7200 RPM/ min. Parallels is Version 5584. MacOs before upgrading was 10.4.11. I upgraded with a Leopard 10.5 Upgrade DVD (bought for 50 Dollars through ebay) by choosing " Aktualisieren" and the old 10.4 was overwritten. Upgrading was very fast without any problem. On the same disk i had the newest version of VMWare Fusion and the newest Mac Version of the excellent Open Source Virtualizer VirtualBox (Freeware!). A little note beside: VirtualBox gained the same Overall Values by Benchmarking with xBench and Geekbench as Parallels and VMWare Fusion for Windows XP and Windows Vista Ultimate.

    The same Upgrade Procedure i did for two external disks, one connected by Firewire, the other by USB. Again without any problem. After Leopard 10.5 was installed, i upgraded all three disks with the Combo Update to 10.5.2 and with the Graphic Updater without problems.

    The results: Leopard 10.5.2 is significant faster with better performance on all three disks (one internal and two external) than Tiger 10.4 benchmarked by Geekbench and xBench 1.3.
    - Benchmarks with Geekbench (Windows) for XP and Vista on the Parallels-, VMWare Fusion- and VirtualBox-Platform were higher with Leopard 10.5.2 than with Tiger 10.4.
    - Results: I overclocked on all three Platforms Windows XP Professional SP2 and Vista Ultimate with the freeware CPUID. In the file menue of CPUID choose Multiplier Setting and set the Multiplier to a value of 20. Click apply. That is it.
    -Some values: Wih Parallels i got for XP a Geekbench Overall Value of 11500! This is the highest value of over 2200 Geekbench Benchmarks. Faster and higher as the values with the fastest Mac Pro and the fastest Windows PC. With VMwareFusion i got for XP an average Geekbench Value of 10 to 11000 and with Virtual Box for XP a value of 10000. Vista is somewhat slower with lower values. You can see my values on the Geekbench Internet Page by clicking on "Top Core 2 Duo Benchmarks", when you submit your own values.

    Conclusion: On all three Platforms XP and Vista have with Leopard an excellent performance and exciting high Geekbench Values. Vista is slower than XP.
    - For the Leopard Update you do not need the Full Version, better is a 10.5 Leopard Upgrade DVD. You do not need with this procedure any erasing, cleaning or cloning.
     
  12. driver49

    driver49

    Messages:
    64
    Ready... Set.. UPGRADE!

    Hello, mjokerst. I hope you're still monitoring this forum.

    I'd said when last we posted that I was planning to conduct this upgrade from Tiger to Leopard in the middle of March. The time has finally arrived, and I'm planning to do this on Monday, March 17.

    I have reviewed all of your messages here, and this is the procedure I'm going to be following:

    1) Uninstall Parallels Desktop 3.0 from Tiger, using the Parallels uninstall tool;

    2) Create a fully bootable backup of my HDD to an external drive (I have a USB2.0 drive; I have tested the bootable backup, and it works fine; a tad on the slow side, but suitable for an emergency);

    2a) In addition to the fully bootable backup if the Mac HD, also make a full back up of the Mac/Documents/Parelles folder, like you say, "just in case."

    3) Prior to running the Leopard install, make sure the bootable external drive is mounted;

    4) Perform the Leopard upgrade to my MacBook using the "erase/install" method

    5) When Leopard finishes installing, "setup assistant" will open and import all my programs and setting from the bootable external drive into the new Leopard OS. Parallels will not be imported because it was uninstalled before I created the bootable disk;

    6) Install Parallels Desktop. Here is where I have some questions:

    I have already downloaded build 5584 to my desktop from the Parallels website. Is that a complete program, or something that wants to update my prior build? When I install it, will it ask me for the serial number from my initial install disk? How else will it know that I'm a paid Parallels customer?

    7) Install _____ Tools. Your post says "Windows Tools" but the "Tools" menu only shows "Parallels Tools." I presume that is what you mean.


    At that point, I gather, I should be able to run Leopard, Parallels, and Windows all just as I could before with Tiger, and the upgrade to Leopard will be complete insofar as my Parallels and Windows XP installations are concerned. Right?

    Two more questions:

    1) which is the best/right build of Parallels to run with Leopard? When I performed a "check for update" within Parallels, it delivered build 5582; but when I went to the website and downloaded directly, it delivered build 5584.

    2) if I understand you correctly, I want to go into this process with not one but TWO fully bootable versions of my MacHD: One made BEFORE I uninstall Parallels b4128 (in case the whole thing blows up), and another made AFTER I uninstall Parallels b4128 -- and that is the one I want have mounted when I'm ready to do the upgrade and run Setup Assistant to import my existing programs and settings into Leopard. Right?

    It all sounds much more complicated than I expect it really is. But I've made an appointment for 2:00 on Monday to go down to the local Apple store so that one of their gurus can hold my hand while I'm doing all this. Should be interesting...

    Thank,s

    --PS
     
  13. driver49

    driver49

    Messages:
    64
    One further note: I have been advised that in order for the Setup assistant to work, the bootable backup HAS TO BE FIREWIRE. So I'm off to the store now...

    --PS
     
  14. mjokerst

    mjokerst

    Messages:
    14
    Morning Driver,

    A couple comments on your procedure. You didn't mentioned if you have read thru the "Taking Contol" ebook, so here's some additional thoughts for step 5: It's not as automatic as you write, you must activate the assistant. Re-writing step 5: After the install is completed, a screen will appear asking "Do you already own a Mac?" And at the bottom it asks "Would you like to transfer your information?" Select the radio button that reads "from another volume on the mac" then push "Continue". If you skip this step, you lose the setup assistant option.

    (There are some important steps prior to "erase/install" from the eBook, I'll just list some of them: Repair permissions (using Disk Utility), Verify Hard Disk (again from Disk Utility), Remove any applications you no longer use, and very important: Update all you OSX applications before upgrading to Leopard.)

    The setup assistant next brings up an options page: You can opt to transfer USERS, NETWORK and OTHER SETTINGS, APPLICATIONS, and one mystery option "FILES and FOLDERS on VOLUMENAME". Go ahead and check them all, including the "FILES..." option. It (FILES and FOLDERS...) refers to root level files, library files and stuff your applications need to run properly. Why it is an option is the mystery. A very last option "OTHER HARD DISKS" may appear if you have other volumes connected, and the answer is likely to NOT transfer this data.

    The eBook also cautions that some /system files will not be transferred, such as some drivers and some kernal extensions. This may cause some applications to fail if they depend on these things. The eBook has a procedure for restoring these things at a later point, after the Leopard install. Third party keyboards and mice are effected.

    New Step 5b: After Leopard installs and releases the unit back to you AND prior to installing parallels, test the Leopard install and all your OSX apps and devices and make any necessary tweaks. You want your OSX volume up and running with no issues before you install parallels, otherwise IT GETS COMPLICATED. For mine, I had to unplug and replug my keyboard and mouse before they worked properly. It turned out later that my HP Officejet had issues with Leopard with regard to scanning, but at this point the printer worked. At this step, I would go online and install any outstanding OSX upgrades such as Itunes, Quicktime and upgrade Leopard itself up to 10.5.2. Make sure at this point that your /DOCUMENTS/PARALLELS folder is in it's proper place. Compare the folder with your backup, check file names or the like. Get all of that working, then

    New Step 5c: Make a bootable copy of your tested/debugged/tweaked/up-to-date Leopard install. This protects you in the remote case that the parallels install in step 6 goes haywire. It will save you going all the way back to Tiger world and starting over.

    Step 6: Install Parallels. At this point, a piece of cake.

    To your questions:

    Build 5584: I installed directly from the downloaded build 5584 dmg file without issue, including no request for my ID. It is complete. I believe your license info is kept in the ~/documents/parallels folder and is found by parallels once you start the newly installed app.

    Yes, it is the "Install Parallels Tools" option under the "Action" menu. Good question, the parallels update docs always say "be sure to install windows tools after upgrading", but then you can never find anything called windows tools. I guess it's generically named "parallels tools" so it can activate tools for linux and other OS's as well as windows.

    Yes, once you install parallels build 5584, you should be able to run windows as before. I'm gonna pitch that eBook one more time, because it does contain procedures for the after-install to help restore any apps that wont operate properly. But at any rate, after installing parallels, start it in the usual manner. Once the windows window appears, DON'T start windows, but go to the Actions menu and click the "install parallels tools" option, then you can start windows. If it asks for license info, OR the windows window does not appear after you first start parallels, it means parallels hasn't found your parallels folder in ~/DOCUMENTS/PARALLELS/. For my install, all my windows applications and devices worked fine, no tweaking was required.

    Best build: I dunno. I'm running 5584. I tried asking that same question on the forums and never did get an answer. I would go with the latest version.

    Backup Twice? After reading the parallels forums when Leopard first came out, there was so much angst with crashing systems and unbootable units that I got pretty paranoid and embarked on making this very tedious little procedure. It worked. I never had to go back and reload a backup and start over. But stuff happens, no two computers are alike. Having backups staged along the way is just good insurance. The backup prior to the parallels unistall may be a wee bit paranoid.

    If you ever visit MacFixIt forums, they have some great tutorials available, and you'll find that the above process is pretty much par for any upgrade. Going with the default "install" option is a crap-shoot. Sometimes it works, sometimes it doesn't. The general MacFixIt sequence for any upgrade/update is: Clean up the system. Repair permissions. Make a bootable backup. Upgrade.

    Somewhere I read that your Mac is not a refrigerator (runs till it dies), it's a 55 Chevy and you got to open the hood frequently if you want it to run reliable and smooth. Both Apple but especially Microsoft would have us think these are refrigerators. I think that's what makes any windows pc degrade rapidly after two years time: it builds clutter upon clutter until it can only stutter.

    The Firewire drive will speed things along considerably. CarbonCopyCloner is a great utility for making a bootable no frills backup, it's freeware, but so good I sent the guy some money. My firewire/carboncopy does one gig per minute making bootable clone. Get the eBook, there's a few pages you want to print out before you embark. Bring some entertainment with you.

    And remember, it's only complicated because we're dealing with windows. It's redundant to say complicated and windows in the same breath.
     
  15. driver49

    driver49

    Messages:
    64
    eBook

    mjokerst,

    I did buy that eBook you recommended, and I'm going through it.

    Have to run, thanks SO much for these detailed instructions. I'll take another look tomorrow.

    --PS
     
  16. driver49

    driver49

    Messages:
    64
    Success!

    mjokerst,

    Thanks in no small part to all the recommendations you made here, I executred my Leopard erase/install upgrade today, and other than the fact that it took nearly four hours from start to finish, it appears to have come off flawlessly. I have Mac 0S 10.5.2 running on my MacBook and Parallels with Windows XP now running in its own "Space," so that I don't have to look at the Windows task bar all the time any more.

    The only thing even close to a snag that I encountered was with the Windows startup after I'd installed Parallels. I wanted to run "Install Parallels Tools" from the "Actions" menu, but that option was dimmed out. The only option I had was a menu item to "Prepare Parallels Tools Upgrade" (or something like that). I clicked on that option, and it didn't appear that anything was happening for a quite a while, until just as I was about to give up, I got a window saying "ready to install Parallels Tools" or something like that. I ran the program, and now everything is just as it used to be, Parallels running in Coherence.

    So again, my sincere thanks for all the help your offered here. Thanks in large part to your suggestions -- including the one to buy that eBook, which I did -- everything came off without a hitch.

    I hope that others can benefit from your experience and detailed instructions here.

    Thanks,

    --PS
     
  17. LBelg

    LBelg

    Messages:
    18
    Thank you!

    I just wanted to say thanks for the lengthy and very, very carefully outlined steps for making a successful upgrade from Tiger to Leopard, and then getting Parallels 5584 to work seamlessly again.

    I, too, had purchased the "Take Control of Upgrading to Leopard" e-book and between that and mjokerst's excellent point-by-point approach, I completed everything that needed doing without a single problem or misstep.

    Now, with luck, whenever this SP3 update comes out for Windows XP, we won't have to suffer any new nightmares!

    Anyway, my most sincere thanks for that terrific post.
     
  18. First of all, thanks to everyone for all the advice. I am just about to upgrade my MacBook Pro from Tiger to Leopard. One wrinkly in my case: I will also be upgrading from Parallels Desktop V3 to V4. I plan to follow all the steps as outlined in the posts. Then, at step 6, I will install Parallels V4 on Leopard (instead of reinstalling V3), then use with that my existing Parallels V3 VM. If I am right, Parallels V4 will "convert" my existing V3 VM the first time I run it, and everything will be fine. Also, I saw the notes about using Setup Assistant with Firewire, not USB. Unfortunately, my company only bought a USB drive, but I have read elsehwre that this will work fine (though slow). Let's hope so. I will elt you know how I get on. Cheers!
     
  19. Irene d

    Irene d

    Messages:
    1
    Advice on whether Parallels 6 can work for me?

     
  20. ExeloM

    ExeloM Banned

    Messages:
    5
    Hey, just wanna know if the bootable back up you make of Tiger include all or some of the Windows partition data?[​IMG]
     

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