Migrate Windows PVM to Another Mac

Discussion in 'Windows Guest OS Discussion' started by TheRealSonicFan, Jun 17, 2022.

  1. TheRealSonicFan

    TheRealSonicFan Bit Poster

    Messages:
    2
    As I am switching from my old Intel MacBook Pro to Intel Mac Pro, I don't know if I can simply transfer the Windows PVM file to new Mac without needing to reactivate Windows. Will I be able to perform the transfer hassle-free?
     
  2. GampaA@Parallels

    GampaA@Parallels Staff Member

    Messages:
    439
    Hello TheRealSonicFan, Please refer to the knowledge base article to transfer the PVM file to the new Mac. Thanks.
     
  3. Mark Fine

    Mark Fine Kilo Poster

    Messages:
    480
    The KB Robot, @GampaA@Parallels, and his 'recommended' article fail to mention an extremely important fact that if you are using the TPM Chip you will need to disable it prior to moving it off the original Mac, then re-enable it once on the new Mac. If you fail to do this before deleting it off the original Mac, your VM will be t.u. worthless. Also see https://www.parallels.com/products/desktop/supportinfo/pdfm17_en_US_122702 before proceeding if this is the case.
     
  4. Mark Fine

    Mark Fine Kilo Poster

    Messages:
    480
    Or, it's saving the checksum/serial number/unlock code or whatever ties the VM to that particular machine in Keychain, which is likely the safest place for it. I wouldn't leave that kind of thing in a VM configuration file where it can be easily spoofed or corrupted.
    Bottom line is that the TPM Chip is essentially linking the VM to that particular machine one way or another, and it should be unlinked from that machine before it can be moved.
     
  5. DebasmitaM@Parallels

    DebasmitaM@Parallels Staff Member

    Messages:
    1,148
    Hello,
    Virtual TPM is an optional layer of security for a virtual machine and allows you to protect data from unauthorized access and use additional Windows security features.
    After adding a virtual TPM chip to a VM, Parallels Desktop creates an encrypted file within the virtual machine bundle that acts as a TPM storage. Parallels Desktop encrypts this file using Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) with 128 bits key length and puts the password in Mac System Keychain, which, in turn, is encrypted physical storage, and only Parallels Desktop (or Mac admin) can read the TPM password from Mac Keychain.
     

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